Working Studio! …(part 3)

December 23, 2013

It has been most of six months and quite the progression for my fitting my old larger studio into my smaller home studio (10’x12′ room).

I recently completed a moderate “weekend” build project constructing my new wall easel.  It has been a few weeks since finishing it out.  I have had the chance to paint on it a few times (mostly smaller projects).  It accommodate new ideas quite nicely and quickly, too.  Thus far, I have just 3 vertical masts for the wall.  The shallow profile allows me to easily move my larger easel to ether side of my studio without hindering desired painting space.  I am rather pleased indeed with the brain child of artist Jason Tueller’s easel design.

Studio - still life setup.

Studio – still life setup.

After stumbling into my larger space rover (43″ long x 18 1/4″ deep x 72″ high) far to many times, I decided to down size that too. I settled for a more mobile cart from the IKEA kitchen department.  It’s all metal components offer forgiving clean up and flexible palette space.  It is perfectly sized for hosting my masterson palette, paint tubes and other materials as needed.  It even has a roomy drawer for my brushes and palette knives.   Even better that it did not break my budget.

I also added a few floater shelves for displaying smaller panels and  a second narrow book case to host my additional art books and collections.   The additional book case offers a nice spot to set up still life objects for painting.  I plan to add a smaller shallow writing desk for my laptop and eventually a drop leaf drafting table to accommodate watercolors.

Figuring out what I needed in my studio has been a longer process than I anticipated.  I have had to cull more than I believed, and build more of what I needed to fit the purpose.

But I am pleased so far, small and functional is the key to getting my studio back to work here.

Advertisements

Studio set up…

October 14, 2013

Any studio space requires few specific component: lighting, easel (work space), and storage for materials.  Arranging them all to fit the artist needs is quite the challenge, and can drive some of us simply mad.It has been nearly five months since I moved to my smaller blank studio. It has taken me most of that time to research studio setups, build in storage, set up lighting.

I recently started building in a wall easel to accommodate larger paintings without sacrificing floor space.   It is effectively a large 8′ x 8′ easel with multiple vertical masts to accommodate BIG paintings or multiple panels side by side. Thankfully, the simpler design requires very few major tools.  I did find the auto leveler quite useful for the 8ft expanse.  I still need fabricate the bar clamps (awaiting parts), but I am excited about it!

Wall easel framed out.

Wall easel framed out.

The wall easel is quite brilliant and inspired by Jason Tueller http://paperbirdstudio.net/wall-easel/.

Meanwhile all this time, I continued to struggle to really get a feel for what my studio space should be.  So much to my frustration even after installing the wall easel, my studio still felt out of sorts.  I kept turning around to find myself walking back out of the cave, even more frustrated.

So this morning, I resolved to flip the layout of my studio in hopes of opening up the space.  We took down the wall easel (sanded down any fussy spots) and reassembled it on the opposite wall.  This required me to relocate the lighting to the opposite side of my studio.   I have also realized I should down size my giant taboret to soon to something more smaller.

Studio Flip

Studio Flip

After much help from my loving husband, I have achieved a better layout and better energy for working.  I have room set aside for future still life area,more shelving, a work desk and a resting / thinking spot.  I even worked in a short still life study to find myself positively happy even after whipping it off.

Tonight, the studio feels so much better with open wall space and balanced lighting.
Success!!