Scouting Paintings

April 21, 2016

Spring is here! It has been most of 5 winter months, with very little plein air painting.  I have ventured out a few times since January to paint.  Only to return home with frozen paint fingers and very little actual painting started.

Now that spring is definitely here.   Everything is blooming in a wide range of colors and compositions.  Spring offers lots of opportunities to paint, especially with the wide variety of Texas wild flowers here that deckle our rich historical architecture and homes. It’s truly inspiring but can be overwhelming too.   The challenge is selecting a location to paint.  To discover a spot that will still be interesting at the end of the painting.

So a few weeks back I opted to just look for painting locations.   Luckily the local town was founded in 1848 and has a large selection of historic architecture and homes nestled among wild flower and poppy gardens.  So there is a lot to choose from.    Thankfully, the weather was quite comfortable for walking through the neighborhoods. I happily spent my Saturday morning, just scouting out new opportunities looking for possible compositions.

As with all plein air painting there are challenges to consider, like location, safety, shelter from elements, or traffic?  Is it safe to park and set up your easel in a new area?  Is there sufficient shade shelter to protect you from the sun or unexpected shower?  How much street traffic can have a major impact on the ability to start let alone finish a painting on-site.   Is there a decent spot to stand without disturbing any unwanted pests like fire ants or wasps?

 

I also find it very helpful to include pictures of the street signs to help remember where my best locations are. Lastly,  it always a good idea to introduce your self to the locals before you discover you are in “someone’s spot.”

Luckily my scouting about the poppies worked out.  As I was recording possible spots, I stumbled upon a lovely side street garden.  It was so inspiring!  I decided to introduce my self and say thank you for such a wonderful spot.  Now I have another place to go and share the fun of painting new garden stories.

Since then it has rained a fair amount with more rain.  Which means my plein air painting outside will be very limited for me in the next few weeks.  So I have been perusing my stash of pictures scored on my outing and working out preliminary sketches.  Which means should I get the chance to go paint I will know just where is my next stop!

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prepping fresh ideas...

Fresh ideas to choose from~ lots more to paint.

I can’t believe it has only been two weeks since my recent painting retreat.  It was a much-needed break just for painting!

I found my self so excited to paint.  Yet, the analytical part of my artist was overwhelmed with cataloging the variety of compositions and palette possibilities.   Everything was already painted in raw pigments and it changed every few minutes.  No kidding, the morning light changed so quickly we could barely contain our excitement let alone finish drink our coffee.  The afternoon and evening  sun was just as dramatic.  I could barely record it all on my camera.  So I painted what I could, and came back home to paint more in my studio.

I came home ready to paint.  Over the next few days I walked into my studio and promptly froze at the easel trying to pick a painting to start next.  It should not be this difficult.  It’s not, I was just over complicating it ~ trying to guess what the next sale could be.  And yet, there I stood.  I turned around and walked out of my studio more frustrated than I realized.

A few hours later I had regrouped, cropped and printed most of 20 plus thumbnail images from my recent adventures as well as other local plein-air treks. These were all in my “to paint” files.  I took them upstairs and sat on my studio floor.  Meanwhile I lined up all of my fresh RETREAT paintings to remind me of what I wanted to paint.

I made a fresh cup of tea and just looked at the images. I spent a few more hours just evaluating the unique interest I had with each printed reference.  Eventually, the exciting ones made it into a smaller pile, which I then taped to my easel wall.    I discovered I was looking for a certain tangible energy in my subjects and paints.  I realized I was finally gaining a bit more clarity in my studio again for a little while before family life returned.

I came back with some great paintings but I also came back with a few new realizations for determining what is driving me to paint these days.

  1. Paint the Exciting!
  2. Fresh Paint, Clean Paint!
  3. Don’t wreck it trying to “fix it“.

In the past week I have painted a least 7 paintings.  I  have wiped away several of these after realizing they were “fix its”.  I realized I could revisit the composition in a new way any time I wanted.  Or I could simply paint something else EXCITING at the moment and see where it might lead.  I have definitely scored a few surprises as well!

I will blog more on the 3 realizations later in the week…

 

Golden Roots to painting!

January 2, 2014

It’s the second day of the new year and my second run at painting in my studio since it was just near 49 degrees outside.
This is my first complete painting for the new year.  🙂

Golden Roots 6x6 2014_01_02

Golden Roots 6×6 2014_01_02

Click to Bid here!
It started with the recent challenge project on Dailypaintworks:  focus on the Roots!  Sure why not.
I used the excuse to purchase some of my favorite golden beets. 🙂  They should be fun to paint and even better for dinner later.  I set them in the dramatic morning light until I found some rich shadow play.   Eye Candy!
Then I set about the challenge.   The color palette offers rich cad oranges of the beet bottoms contrasted against the cool shadows and green tops. Every bit the visual mixing challenge.  I established warm lights and cooler shadows.  I pushed the values in the lights and the shadows to bring up the forms and establish volume in the beets.

So there is the “Golden Root” for today’s painting.   Enjoy!

My wall easel is done and all ready to accommodate larger paintings awaiting my attention.  The wall easel has a minimal depth requirement but can accommodate a 7’x8′ painting easily enough or multiples pieces at the same time.

Wall easel & Clamps complete!

Wall easel & Clamps complete!

Two weeks ago, I started building the wall easel for my studio inspired by artist Jason Tueller’s design and handy work.  The first weekend, I knocked out most of the build project, installing wall braces and vertical rails in an earlier blog Oct 14 (Studio set up).

However, I still needed to make the clamping bars to hold my paintings on the easel.  It has been slower process to fabricate those parts.

Canvas clamping bars

Canvas clamping bars

I had to trouble shoot how to notch out the back part of the clamp to fit around the vertical rails.  I definitely wanted to have them adjustable in height to accommodate small and large pieces.  So I had to plan my process to keep the wood blocks true during and after the build to provide a better fit on the vertical rails.

I have limited tools.  I have a circular saw, a drill and other basic carpentry tools.  I did not have access to a table saw or sanding table that might have made quicker work of the pieces I needed.

back plate

back plate

I am a smart girl, so I used set the depth on my circular saws to score out a 1/4″ deep notch. Then set to removing a six-inch section were needed.  Sanded it a bit to remove any splinters.  Then clamped the matching pieces, drilled peg holes and securing threaded flanges.

clamping the pieces.

clamping the pieces.

I will admit they many not be flawless, but they definitely work!  Now I am all set for starting and finishing my next big project!

Airplane Gardens

October 30, 2013

Airplane Garden 6x6

Airplane Garden 6×6 2013_10_29

Click to Bid here.
My recent adventures yielded a new Airplane plant with lots of happy baby shoots.   I have the perfect balcony niche for it to drape over.

I noticed it nestled into the evening shadows after sunset.  The low light offered a nice opportunity to play with lost shapes and edges as well as colors.  So I moved my Easy-L out on to the landing and started painting.  I enjoyed pushing paint and working out color shifts.  I love defining the shapes of wisps and floating tendrils with playful brushwork.
It was a fun stretch for daily painting.

Studio set up…

October 14, 2013

Any studio space requires few specific component: lighting, easel (work space), and storage for materials.  Arranging them all to fit the artist needs is quite the challenge, and can drive some of us simply mad.It has been nearly five months since I moved to my smaller blank studio. It has taken me most of that time to research studio setups, build in storage, set up lighting.

I recently started building in a wall easel to accommodate larger paintings without sacrificing floor space.   It is effectively a large 8′ x 8′ easel with multiple vertical masts to accommodate BIG paintings or multiple panels side by side. Thankfully, the simpler design requires very few major tools.  I did find the auto leveler quite useful for the 8ft expanse.  I still need fabricate the bar clamps (awaiting parts), but I am excited about it!

Wall easel framed out.

Wall easel framed out.

The wall easel is quite brilliant and inspired by Jason Tueller http://paperbirdstudio.net/wall-easel/.

Meanwhile all this time, I continued to struggle to really get a feel for what my studio space should be.  So much to my frustration even after installing the wall easel, my studio still felt out of sorts.  I kept turning around to find myself walking back out of the cave, even more frustrated.

So this morning, I resolved to flip the layout of my studio in hopes of opening up the space.  We took down the wall easel (sanded down any fussy spots) and reassembled it on the opposite wall.  This required me to relocate the lighting to the opposite side of my studio.   I have also realized I should down size my giant taboret to soon to something more smaller.

Studio Flip

Studio Flip

After much help from my loving husband, I have achieved a better layout and better energy for working.  I have room set aside for future still life area,more shelving, a work desk and a resting / thinking spot.  I even worked in a short still life study to find myself positively happy even after whipping it off.

Tonight, the studio feels so much better with open wall space and balanced lighting.
Success!!

Water Gardens

September 9, 2013

Water Garden Vase

Water Garden Vase 6″x6″

Click to bid here!
Week end paint out inspirations right in our own community.  The local water garden and nursery features a number of spots that offer a quiet shady spot to paint in the last of the summer heat.  Koi ponds, water fountains and plant arrangements to inspire the gardener as well as the painters in all of us.  Not to mention plenty of room for my Easy-L easel.

I love how this sweet little gem came together for my painting.  It was a bot bumpy at first but I refined my focus and re-sketched me composition & washed it in.   The light played a good deal of hide & seek, but I captured the vase form, water splashing in the pond quiet successfully.